TIFF 2022: Our Review of ‘Sidney’

Posted in Festival Coverage, Movies, TIFF 2022 by - September 11, 2022
TIFF 2022: Our Review of ‘Sidney’

Icons just will themselves to a different level…

Sidney is the definitive portrait of a man who understood the importance of a sense of self inside one’s own community.

From director Reginald Hudlin, and told in the man’s own words himself; this film traces the evolution of someone who made himself into the kind of man that generations of young African-American men have looked up to as one with pride and understanding in the power of his own voice.

The film allows us to respect his ownership over the very art that he put on the screen through the use of archival footage, clips from a myriad of his most iconic films and sit down interviews with those who knew and those who loved him best.

His commitment to social change in the midst of the civil rights movement had power as he successfully curated an early career that was filled with entertaining moments that also meant something on a profound level for African-American audiences.

As he reinvented himself in his later years, this piece of cinema serves as a testament to how he was an ever evolving talent on the pop culture landscape who was always capable of making an impact.

Sidney never loses sight of what a beacon of hope he was in a world that so desperately needed the integrity that man brought the world on a daily basis.  Even in its overall and glowing praise, it never devalues the icon that he was and still is.

This post was written by
David Voigt is a Toronto based writer with a problem and a passion for the moving image and all things cinema. Having moved from production to the critical side of the aisle for well over 10 years now at outlets like Examiner.com, Criticize This, Dork Shelf (Now That Shelf), to.Night Newspaper he’s been all across his city, the country and the continent in search of all the news and reviews that are fit to print from the world of cinema.
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