Poetic: Our Review of ‘Drifting Snow’

Posted in Movies, VOD/iTunes/DigitalDownload by - May 12, 2021
Poetic: Our Review of ‘Drifting Snow’

Some films will keep you glued to the edge of your seat for the high-octane action, and others will hold you for the beautiful story they are telling. Drifting Snow, the latest from filmmaker Ryan Noth, is the latter of the two.

Drifting Snow follows the story of two strangers who meet one night after a near collision on a remote road in eastern Ontario. Forced to travel together, their trip gives them time to learn about each other, and they soon discover they are both dealing with loss and grieving in their own way as they face an uncertain future. Chris (Jonas Bonnetta) is a young videographer whose eyesight is starting to fail him. He’s come back to the country to settle his late mother’s affairs, and doesn’t know where his life is headed. Joanne (Sonja Smits) has seen her life open wide after the death of her husband, and she is looking forward to whatever the future may bring her. Both soon realize however that although they’ve lived different lives, they both face the future in the same way, with optimism and without fear.

The first thing that catches your eye in Drifting Snow is the wonderful cinematography. From the snow-covered landscapes to the tiny towns and creaky homes, you are instantly transported to the country in the middle of winter where and when the film takes place. Without it, you might not have been able to feel the melancholy both characters are feeling throughout the film. It’s the dialogue however that really pulls everything together. It helps define the characters, showcasing their never-give-up attitudes, while keeping positive no matter how blurry things may look. One thing to note,  whether intended or not, Ryan Noth focuses the camera on birds throughout the film, symbolizing the main characters’ freedom to do whatever they want.

Jonas Bonnetta does a fantastic job playing the role of Chris. At times you can tell it is his first role, but it doesn’t detract from his performance at all. His awkward moments seem to fit the character well, almost like he intended to play him that way. Sonja Smits on the other hand is the star of the show. She’s one of those rare breed of actresses who are as comfortable playing an older character as she was playing younger ones in the early part of her career. She’s a Canadian treasure that always shines on the screen.

While it’s not a long film, Drifting Snow will stick with you and leave you hoping you can gracefully face the changes life throws at you as well as Chris and Joanne do. It’s a beautiful film about friendship, hope and change when things aren’t going the way you expected them to.

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While Roderick has only been writing movie reviews for a relatively short time, he's been a fan of film for as long as he can remember. It's a love affair that started when he saw Star Wars at a drive-in theatre in Kitchener when he was four years old. In the past decade he's fulfilled his dream of interviewing celebrities, attending red carpets events at festivals such as TIFF and writing reviews for outlets such as Realstylenetwork.com. He's always on the hunt for the next big thing to hit the screen.
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