All Star Cr*p: Our Review of ‘Don’t Look Up’

All Star Cr*p: Our Review of ‘Don’t Look Up’

Adam McKay’s Don’t Look Up comes at a moment when humanity is trying to avoid end times while simultaneously is one of a few movies coming out imagining such end times (Dune maybe, Marvel, Free Guy maybe). But it also feels retro in a sense, since it reminds me of other asteroid/ comet movies that came out in the 90s because an asteroid almost hit Earth. Yesterday’s panic can always return though, as the few Ebola/ Swine Flu films got real popular last year. It’s always possible that this movie will regain popularity if we find a comet hitting Earth.

This …

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Introducing The Tuna Awards!

Blog ‐ December 21, 2021

For many reasons, the best sport in the world is American College Football. The best reason college football is incredible is because it’s dumb. It’s a sport where eventual hall of famers go up against eventual car insurance salesman. It’s a sport where, realistically, three or four teams can actually be national champion, but that doesn’t stop people from getting indignant when one of those teams does end up doing so. A sport where Alabama is the undisputed center of the sport. It’s a sport where they give you big bowls of food for winning specific games.

The premiere voice of …

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Big Hot Mess: Jennifer Lawrence, Anne Hathaway syndrome, and ‘mother!’

Originally, I debated using Red Sparrow for this piece, because mother! is seen to be more akin to director Darren Aronofsky’s wild, self-aggrandizing mess. I see it instead as a failed Jennifer Lawrence (henceforth occasionally referred to as J-Law) vehicle. However, Red Sparrow is pretty bland, and writers would use it in the same way I’m using mother! anyways. I did want this to be a J-Law piece in honour of the release of the new Adam McKay film Don’t Look Up, as it’s the thirty-one-year-old actress’ return to theatres for the first time in two full years, but it’s …

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Menage a Deux: Our Review Of ‘Emily In Paris’

Netflix, What's Streaming? ‐ December 20, 2021
Menage a Deux: Our Review Of ‘Emily In Paris’

It’s about time that one of most controversial shows came back on Netflix. I am, of course, writing about Emily In Paris which, as it turns out, doesn’t have the amount of haters as Twitter would like me to believe. The haters understandably came in droves because of a viral out of context clip from the show. The one where the titular Emily Cooper (Lily Collins) Karens a hot chef, Gabriel (Lucas Bravo). But the show’s first season, in its entirety, is a lot of things. is probably the most nihilistic piece of comedy in recent television under the guise …

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Royals Going Off: Our Review Of ‘Margrete: Queen of the North’

What's Streaming? ‐ December 19, 2021
Royals Going Off: Our Review Of ‘Margrete: Queen of the North’

In the early 1400s, Queen Margrete (Trine Dyrholm) ruled, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland. Her more humble subjects include two chambermaids eating at the staff kitchen gossiping about her. She gained and maintained those territories both through birthright and marriage. But the gossip that the new chambermaid, Astrid (Agnes Westerlund Rase), learns from her colleague is about Margrete’s ways. About another method she used to maintain peace in one of the largest kingdoms in medieval Europe. That way, by the way, involved murdering her teenage son and heir Oluf, a move that makes no sense. Maybe these two women should not …

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‘The Lost Daughter’ – Catching up with Maggie Gyllenhaal and her Uber Talented Cast!

Interviews, Movies, Netflix ‐ December 16, 2021
‘The Lost Daughter’ – Catching up with Maggie Gyllenhaal and her Uber Talented Cast!

Buckle up for Maggie Gyllenhaal’s directorial debut The Lost Daughter, based on the very popular novel written by Elena Ferrante.The best selling novel has struck a chord with readers worldwide. And there is no doubt that the movie will get people talking! Meet Leda, played by Olivia Colman, one of the most unsympathetic characters on earth! Leda’s a British woman on vacation in Greece, alone. She shares the beach with a loud, obnoxious family from New York. This family seems to be infringing on Leda’s territory, disturbing her solitude shouting and swearing.A member of the family asks for her beach umbrella …

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‘The Novice’ – A Star Making Turn for Isabelle Fuhrman (Interview)

Interviews, Movies ‐ December 16, 2021
‘The Novice’  – A Star Making Turn for Isabelle Fuhrman (Interview)

Isabelle Fuhrman takes competitive College rowing to the next level in The Novice.Fuhrman plays Alex Dall, a queer college freshman who joins her university’s rowing team. She undertakes an obsessive physical and psychological journey to make it to the top varsity boat, no matter the cost. Intent on outperforming her teammates, Alex pushes herself to her limits and beyond. This alienates everyone around her in the name of success. Fuhrman’s fierce lead performance collides with Lauren Hadaway’s bold direction and dynamic editing. Together, they create a visceral window into a cutthroat world. Stylish cinematography and a seductive soundtrack complete the …

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Human Nature: Our Review Of ‘The Lost Daughter’

Human Nature: Our Review Of ‘The Lost Daughter’

British-American academic Leda Caruso (Olivia Colman) can do something logical. And that logical thing is to take a retreat with her fellow academics. In doing so, she might deal with the members of that profession and their varying degrees of agreeable or insufferable. Maggie Gyllenhaal’s adaptation of Elena Ferrante’s The Lost Daughter eventually shows a younger version of Leda (Jessie Buckley) taking such a retreat and meeting a fellow academic (Peter Sarsgard), but her present day version has her taking a road less travelled at least to her. She takes her working holiday to a Greek island that has its …

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Beachfront Blues: Our Review of ‘Suzanna Andler’

OVID.tv ‐ December 15, 2021
Beachfront Blues: Our Review of ‘Suzanna Andler’

The actors of Benoit Jacquot’s Suzanna Andler don’t always turn their backs from the camera, but there are enough moments when they do that it adds an alienating effect to the film, which is not a good tone to take in depicting an unapproachable subject. At least, to North American proletarian brutes like us, the unapproachable subject is the milieu of rich sad wives of mid-twentieth century France. In particular, the titular sad housewife (Charlotte Gainsbourg) takes visits from her neighbour – it’s complicated – Monique (Julia Roy). She makes calls to her off screen husband Jean. But most importantly, …

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Throwback Horror: Our Review of ‘The Scary of Sixty-First’

Movies ‐ December 14, 2021

Horror movies have gone through a lot of changes over the years, and unfortunately not all eras are as good as others. The 70s and 80s for instance saw a lot of low-budget horror b-movies made that everyone should probably forget. Not all of them are bad though. In fact not only are some of them cult classics today, but some are even considered masterpieces. The Scary of Sixty-First feels like one of those throwback horror movies, but unfortunately it’s far from a masterpiece, or even a cult classic.  It’s one of those films you should consider not watching in …

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