CUFF Docs 2020: ‘Flint: Who Can You Trust?’

CUFF Docs 2020: ‘Flint: Who Can You Trust?’

Filmed over a span of five years, Flint: Who Can You Trust? tells the continuing story of Flint, Michigan and their struggle to survive. The people of Flint are decimated by poverty and toxic drinking water. Those conditions were established by a government who seems unable to care for its citizens. They lose faith in the voices that should seem most trustworthy and find themselves lost in a sea of misinformation.

Anthony Baxter (You’ve Been Trumped) wrote and directed Flint and features Alec Baldwin as a narrator. It is a heart-wrenching look at a city left in irreparable ruins. In many ways, Flint feels like a spiritual sequel to Michael Moore’s Roger and Me. Both films examine the fragility of public trust and the damages done to a people at the hands of crooked politicians and business practices. This is a city that continues to suffer from the effects of reckless decisions made at their expense. And Baxter handles their story with empathy and care.

One cannot help but feel burdened for the people of Flint, especially as conflicting stories of water safety continue to mount from ‘reliable’ sources. Trusted voices such as Marc Edwards, Melissa Mayes, Scott Smith and even The Avengers’ Mark Ruffalo all give different answers. But that just makes the people of Flint continue to be torn between contradictions. Whereas Edwards defends his arguments that the water is safe, his connection with a corrupt government marred his public image. Meanwhile, Smith and Ruffalo continue to speak about dangers, despite their own lack of scientific background. At an age where ‘fake news’ has destroyed trust in politicians and reporters alike, Who Can You Trust? is a timely examination of the challenges of trying to discern the truth when no one seems to know what it is.

This post was written by
Born at a very early age, Steve is a Toronto-based writer and podcaster who loves to listen to what matters to our culture on screen. When he first saw Indiana Jones steal the cross of Coronado, he knew his world would never be the same and, since then, he’s found more and more excuses to digest what’s in front of him onscreen. Also, having worked as a youth and community minister for almost 20 years, he learned that stories help everyone engage the world around them. He’s a proud hubby, father (x2) and believes that Citizen Kane, Batman Forever (yes, the Kilmer one), and The Social Network belong in the same conversation. You can hear his ramblings on ScreenFish Radio wherever podcasts are gettable or at his website, ScreenFish.net.
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