TIFF Next Wave 2020: Our Review of ‘Your Turn’

TIFF Next Wave 2020: Our Review of ‘Your Turn’

Directed by Eliza Capai, Your Turn is a wild and relentless look at student life in Brazil as they struggle for free and fair education. Shifting perspectives between three students of different backgrounds (activist Marcela Jesus, aspiring rapper Lucas ‘Koka’ Penteado and president of the student movement, Navara Souza), the film allows their diverse personalities and stories to come to the forefront. Though the non-linear structure muddles the narrative at times, the film’s spirited voice-overs and wild documentary footage give Your Turn a youthful fury that’s infectious.

Most importantly though, the film allows the students to speak for themselves in their own way. As a result, ‘perspective’ becomes the key word for a film that gives voice to a generation that feels unheard. Bouncing off of one another with playfulness and passion, each student narrator has their own focus, ranging from LGBTQ+ and racial issues to the unfairness of the cultural caste system. Featuring extensive footage of youth marches, police brutality against peaceful protesters and unwarranted searches (one scene involving a bicycle is particularly memorable), Your Turn points the audience to the reality of youth injustice for the sake of maintaining control. Fighting for their own future, these are youth who care deeply about the state of their country and are willing to take responsibility for its healing.

Featuring youthful energy, rage and vibrancy all at the same time, Your Turn‘s importance lies in its desire to give voice to a generation who have felt ignored by those in power. Though their protests don’t always achieve the desired results, the film shows the power that people have to incite change when they speak up, regardless of their age.

Your Turn (Espero tuo [re]volta) is currently playing at the TIFF Next Wave Film Festival.

This post was written by
Born at a very early age, Steve is a Toronto-based writer and podcaster who loves to listen to what matters to our culture on screen. When he first saw Indiana Jones steal the cross of Coronado, he knew his world would never be the same and, since then, he’s found more and more excuses to digest what’s in front of him onscreen. Also, having worked as a youth and community minister for almost 20 years, he learned that stories help everyone engage the world around them. He’s a proud hubby, father (x2) and believes that Citizen Kane, Batman Forever (yes, the Kilmer one), and The Social Network belong in the same conversation. You can hear his ramblings on ScreenFish Radio wherever podcasts are gettable or at his website, ScreenFish.net.
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