TIFF 2021: Our Review of ‘The Odd-Job Men’

Posted in Festival Coverage, TIFF 2021, What's Streaming? by - September 09, 2021
TIFF 2021: Our Review of ‘The Odd-Job Men’

I’ve routinely heard the virtues of programming a film festival with your mental mood in mind extolled from others who make sure to try and find some levity in between the darkness. For many, it’s tough to do a large-scale festival like TIFF without finding room for lighter, feel-good fare. This partially explains why films such as Jojo Rabbit and Green Book have played so well at the festival in the past: if you’re watching four films in a day, and three of them are depressing, the one that stands out is the one that’s not like the others.

I however, am not like the other girls, and thus, I loathe seeing films that feel frivolous. “Please, dwell on the darkness,” I scream, because at my heart I am a sad boi. Anyways, this a lot of words to suggest that Neus Ballús’ The Odd Job Men is the very opposite of what I would normally program for myself. Here, Moha (Mohamad Mellalí) is a Moroccan immigrant trying to make it in a bustling Barcelona. He’s taking Catalan classes, and had a tenuous relationship with his boss—the demanding Valero (Valero Escobar). By way of observation, Moha finds the humour and humanity of the city.

On a pleasure scale, The Odd Job Men works well enough to be an enjoyable watch, which likely means it will be a hit at the festival. But the film falls a touch short at being more than simply enjoyable, which is a real shame.

This post was written by
Thomas Wishloff is currently an MA student at York University. He is new to the Toronto Film Scene, but has periodically written and podcasted for several now defunct ventures, and has probably commented on a forum with you at some point. The ex-Edmontonian has been known to enjoy a good board game, and claims to know the secret to the best popcorn in the world.
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