Hot Docs 2022: Our Review of ‘Meeting Point’

Hot Docs 2022: Our Review of ‘Meeting Point’

Directed by Alfredo Garcis and Paulina Costa, Meeting Point allows the filmmakers to explore the pain of their family history. They grew up in Chile under Pinochet’s regime. Pinochet’s military took both their fathers away and held them in a small torture cell within Villa Grimaldi. Although Alfredo’s father was never seen again, Paulina’s father managed to survive. Now, using his testimony, the two families work together to recreate the past using actors in an effort to help them understand what they have never been able to comprehend.

As the Garcias deals with the disappearance of their grandfather almost 50 years ago, so too do they their steps to re-create history manage to bring him to life once again. They base their cinematic venture on the memories of Paulina’s father. It allows them to explore events from the past with as much clarity as memory allows. This process becomes an incredibly emotional journey, leading to many tears shed by those who knew and loved the two men. Nevertheless, this resurrection of the past proves valuable by allowing the younger generation to see what took place. In this way, Point serves as an advocate for those who couldn’t speak for themselves.

At the same time, the film also shows its relevance for the current culture as a whole. Despite the oppression that scarred a nation, the film also reminds the viewer that everything old is new again. Although the events explored took place many decades ago, the turmoil continues in the present as riots and political upheaval take place all around them. For the people of Chile, justice for the people continues to be silenced in the face of power. For them, the intersection between past and present is the true Meeting Point to change the future.

This post was written by
Born at a very early age, Steve is a Toronto-based writer and podcaster who loves to listen to what matters to our culture on screen. When he first saw Indiana Jones steal the cross of Coronado, he knew his world would never be the same and, since then, he’s found more and more excuses to digest what’s in front of him onscreen. Also, having worked as a youth and community minister for almost 20 years, he learned that stories help everyone engage the world around them. He’s a proud hubby, father (x2) and believes that Citizen Kane, Batman Forever (yes, the Kilmer one), and The Social Network belong in the same conversation. You can hear his ramblings on ScreenFish Radio wherever podcasts are gettable or at his website, ScreenFish.net.
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